FAYETTEVILLE — The new workforce center at the University of Arkansas Community College in Hope-Texarkana will be named after Farmers Bank & Trust, which provides $100,000 (in annual donations of $10,000) for 10 years.

The University of Arkansas System Board of Trustees approved the measure, along with those dealing with the University of Arkansas at Monticello and the University of Arkansas Community College at Rich Mountain, Friday at a regular meeting.

This is a “very significant gift”, and Farmers Bank & Trust sees the donation “as the start of a partnership with us; they are ready to support us”, said Christine Holt, Chancellor of the University of Arkansas Community College in Hope-Texarkana.

“We hope to move into the new facilities this spring.”

UA MONTICELLO

The University of Arkansas at Monticello will demolish a pair of buildings on campus after trustees approve.

The pair of 2,600-square-foot wooden buildings at 236 and 242 Forestry Park Drive were built about 70 years ago and “old,” said Chancellor Peggy Doss. The buildings had been used for marketing and redistribution and Forest Service storage.

“We will replace them in the future with buildings that are more beautiful and more useful for our purposes,” she said. The university’s heavy equipment program will be used to raze buildings — the program also razed some old apartments this summer — which will save the university money.

“I like for students to have real-world experience” with shaving, said Ed Fryar, a Rogers UA administrator.

RICH MOUNTAIN

Trustees also approved a lease for the University of Arkansas Community College at Rich Mountain with the Arkansas Development Funding Authority.

The university will lease a gated assisted living facility — it’s “nearly new” — configured for 30 rooms, each with a bathroom and kitchenette, located across from the college’s baseball and softball fields, the college said. Chancellor Phillip Wilson. The annual rent will be approximately $65,617 for a 20-year lease, with a right to purchase for $1 after 20 years.

“If we tried to build something [this size] nine, it would cost over $6 million,” Wilson said. It’s “a lot”, and more than 50 students will be housed there.

“This calculation is quite simple: $1.3 million [cost over 20 years] for a $6 million building,” Fryar said.